A real-world study on 394,828 German T2DM patients

Real-life treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2 patients: An analysis based on a large sample of 394,828 German patients.

Authors: Thomas Wilke, Antje Groth, Andreas Fuchs, Lisa Seitz, Joachim Kienhöfer, Rainer Lundershausen and Ulf Maywald

Objectives: The aim of this claims-based data analysis was to describe the care of German T2DM patients and to determine which subgroups could be differentiated in terms of the achieved T2DM-related treatment results, the underlying comorbidities, and the achieved comorbidity-related treatment results.

Methods: We included all T2DM patients insured by a large sickness fund in 2010/2011. We defined 12 subgroups according to observed HbA1C, blood pressure and Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). For each subgroup, available sociodemographic and clinical information were reported. Different treatment variables were described. T2DM-related events leading to acute hospitalisations were reported.

Results: We included 394,828 T2DM patients in our analysis; for 228,703 patients’ detailed data as basis for subgroup classification were available. For 4.5% of these patients, a HbA1C >9% was observed. 21,833 of the T2DM patients were affected by a T2DM-related event; the risk was 5.53% per patient year; 1.74% of the patients suffered from more than one event. Most frequent event types were hospitalisation with T2DM as primary diagnosis (2.39%), vascular interventions/stent implantations (1.92%), and ischaemic stroke (1.19%). There were significant differences between the observed subgroups in terms of T2DM-related event risk.

Conclusion: Overall, our data indicate that the typically treated T2DM patient has a number of comorbidities and thus treatment focused solely on T2DM is neither possible nor clinically meaningful. Particularly those patients who reached HbA1C goals, but had also achieved relevant additional treatment goals reached low yearly T2DM event rates whereas subgroups failing to achieve one or several treatment goals are facing much higher event risks